Heart of the Lyon: Industrial Lyon Stool, ca. 1940s

We bang on a bit about industrial seating options on this blog. Uhl Toledo stools are a fave, but they’re difficult to find, as they’re no longer in production. Ajusto and Bevco, too, make durable versions that are readily available today, while Hamilton produced very few numbers, so they’re rare as hen’s teeth. More often than not, when factories closed down, these items were scrapped rather than being redistributed to be implemented elsewhere. The perception was that, despite its functionality, a stool was just a stool.

Add to this lot Lyon Metal Products Inc.,  which began production of its industrial-grade storage, seating and lockers in 1901 and remains a mainstay in today’s factory setting.

Beverly Lyon Waters founded what was originally known as the Lyon Metallic Manufacturing Company and was quickly joined by his younger brother, Frank. By 1906 they had secured a large factory and office headquarters in Aurora, Illinois, which enabled them to mass-produce all manner of products fabricated from sheet steel. After merging with the Durand Steel Locker Company of Chicago in 1928, they changed the name to Lyon Metal Products Inc.

Taking the lead in the early stages of WWII, they created a brochure, “How One Company Tackles the War Production Problem,” in which they detailed methods of diverting production toward wartime goods. The War Production Board distributed the pamphlet to hundreds of small manufacturers, thereby securing Lyon a strong market position during this period.

This particular model is understated. The army green, steel frame is welded to become one sturdy piece that sits at a fixed height. No ornate lift mechanisms here! The pressed-steel backrest is also fixed, and rather than an ergonomic wood seat it has a perforated particle-board plate. Despite this, the footrests are conveniently situated for lengthy periods of sitting. Parking your caboose here throughout a full, 8.5-hour shift, however, is another story.

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