Making the Cut: Woodworker’s Bench, ca. 1890s–1920s

To create a table it sometimes requires a table. Or in this case, the workbench to end all workbenches.

Traditionally, benches like this were found in wood shops, basements and garages. Generous enough to hold large and, in some cases, multiple furniture items, the 4-inch-thick maple top provides a stable station. Located on the front and side are vises that keep the project in place. At the rear of the horizontal surface is a gutter where tools and shavings can be pushed aside, while below a later addition including walls and a hinged door form a compartment for storing other tools.

Today, this 7-foot piece is as likely to be found in an open-plan kitchen surround by people sipping drinks or preparing food as it is in a carpentry shop. A thorough cleaning and several coats of polyurethane converted a workhorse like this into a show pony worthy of all the praise and attention it attracts.

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One response to “Making the Cut: Woodworker’s Bench, ca. 1890s–1920s

  1. Just wow…. It would make an incredible shop counter….

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